Me3 starting to lower his goals

toffee

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Wilson humbled himself by parking his private jet at home and flew commercial to Pittsburg via Newark, Wilson even put his entire entourage on a different flight, just so he could be mistaken as flying alone like an average dude.

Now, that's extra effort and sacrifice for a HOF QB, isn't it.

No doubt Giants and Steelers were in tears and bought totally into the effort and planning to start a bidding wall.

There, just so that team Russ knows toffee noticed and acknowledged their effort.
 
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Rosco

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So Hackett was aware of this "known problem" of Russell not listening to his coaches which is why he let Russ cook?

IMO Russell did listen to his coaches in Seattle, at least initially, which is why he and the team were successful. Coaches and players were on the same page. Over the course of the last 4-5 years with us, he began to harbor a different opinion as to the best offense for the Seahawks to the point where the relationship was irreparable. If you want to call that "not listening to his coaches", although I wouldn't characterize it like that, I could accept it.

In Russell's first season with Denver, Hackett yearned to build his offense around his franchise quarterback, or in other words, "Let Russ Cook" as he had done something similar with Aaron Rodgers in Green Bay and had great success. It had nothing to do with a so-called reputation for not listening to coaches. Obviously, it was an abject failure on the part of both the coach and the player.

In Russell's last season with Denver, he was subjected to a much more rigged, structured system under Sean Payton than he was used to under both Hackett and Carroll, a polar opposite philosophy to "Let Russ Cook." It wasn't an intentional not listening so much as it was a "can't teach an old dog new tricks" sort of a thing. Russell did not fit Payton's style of offense as Russell was too used to playing a certain brand of football. It had nothing to do with insubordination as you seem to be suggesting.
Wilson was a slightly better version of Tim Tebow.
 

RiverDog

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Wilson was a slightly better version of Tim Tebow.
Yeah, funny but wholly inaccurate. Tim Tebow's completion percentages are horrible. His career completion percentage is 47.9% and his passer rating was 75.3. For the playoffs, his completion percentage was 40.4%. That's a little more than just a slight difference between Russell or any other starting quarterback over the past 15 years.
 

chris98251

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Well Wilson just went about as low as low gets for Seahawks fans, he is going to be a Stealer, maybe The Rapistburger can help him acclimate to the area.
 

olyfan63

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So Hackett was aware of this "known problem" of Russell not listening to his coaches which is why he let Russ cook?

IMO Russell did listen to his coaches in Seattle, at least initially, which is why he and the team were successful. Coaches and players were on the same page. Over the course of the last 4-5 years with us, he began to harbor a different opinion as to the best offense for the Seahawks to the point where the relationship was irreparable. If you want to call that "not listening to his coaches", although I wouldn't characterize it like that, I could accept it.

In Russell's first season with Denver, Hackett yearned to build his offense around his franchise quarterback, or in other words, "Let Russ Cook" as he had done something similar with Aaron Rodgers in Green Bay and had great success. It had nothing to do with a so-called reputation for not listening to coaches. Obviously, it was an abject failure on the part of both the coach and the player.

In Russell's last season with Denver, he was subjected to a much more rigged, structured system under Sean Payton than he was used to under both Hackett and Carroll, a polar opposite philosophy to "Let Russ Cook." It wasn't an intentional not listening so much as it was a "can't teach an old dog new tricks" sort of a thing. Russell did not fit Payton's style of offense as Russell was too used to playing a certain brand of football. It had nothing to do with insubordination as you seem to be suggesting.
When I look back at Russell's first few years, with Bevell, I realize Pete & Bev knew what Russell could, and couldn't do, and designed the "Russell Wilson Offense" around his skillset, and Marshawn's abilities. They were careful not to tip off the public that it was a "limited" offense. The Jeff Fisher Rams picked up on the limited offense and Russell's limitations from Day 1, AND had the players on D to execute a very frustrating defensive scheme. Other teams didn't have the right horses to neutralize Russell.

I'm with you that there was never really any significant "insubordination" on Russell's part. It was just a matter of what he was and wasn't good at.
 

RiverDog

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When I look back at Russell's first few years, with Bevell, I realize Pete & Bev knew what Russell could, and couldn't do, and designed the "Russell Wilson Offense" around his skillset, and Marshawn's abilities. They were careful not to tip off the public that it was a "limited" offense. The Jeff Fisher Rams picked up on the limited offense and Russell's limitations from Day 1, AND had the players on D to execute a very frustrating defensive scheme. Other teams didn't have the right horses to neutralize Russell.

I'm with you that there was never really any significant "insubordination" on Russell's part. It was just a matter of what he was and wasn't good at.
Good post, and a very likely scenario.

And yeah, I remember the Rams stuffing Beast on a 4th down play to win in overtime. We really weren't that great of a short yardage team, which is one of the reasons why I didn't object to the decision to pass on that infamous SB 49 play.
 
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