If not the Hawks , than GO SF !

Jac

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Ok, but Superbowl teams are a very small sample. If one broadens out the discussion, there are more examples. How about the 22 Huskies that fell short of the Pac-12 title but came back stronger and closer to win it undefeated and fell short of the national title by just one game that they were in until the fourth quarter.
Of course anything's possible...but if you get to the SB, you have to win it. Everything has to fall your way to make it. This was their year, and they blew it. They were healthy across the roster, and KC was vulnerable. A handful (or even a single) play goes differently in the 4th quarter or overtime, and they're SB champions. Now, they have to start over in July. Man, that's a hard pill to swallow. Our team couldn't.
 

Ostatehawk

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If the Chiefs win, then their fan base will become another "look at how many rings we have!" Do we really want to add another fan base who acts like this?
We rarely have a chief fan around here - and I rarely run into them in the wild.
 

Parallax

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Of course anything's possible...but if you get to the SB, you have to win it. Everything has to fall your way to make it. This was their year, and they blew it. They were healthy across the roster, and KC was vulnerable. A handful (or even a single) play goes differently in the 4th quarter or overtime, and they're SB champions. Now, they have to start over in July. Man, that's a hard pill to swallow. Our team couldn't.
That's true. It's one of the ironies of sports that, in some ways, it's harder to come super close and fall short than to fall further away from the goal. This morning it's easier to be a Seahawk fan than a 49ers fan even though their season blew ours out of the water. Those of us who are Husky fans experienced the inverse quite recently.

My sense is it wasn't always this way to the same extent. My sense is that when I was much younger, coming in second still felt pretty good. That this began to shift in the 1970s but has become more pronounced over time. I don't remember college football fans worrying too much about a theoretical national title back in the day. It was about winning your conference, defeating your cross state rival, and winning a bowl game. If I were in charge of life, the universe and everything, I'd turn back the clock on a college football championship and go back to the old ways, as it led to more joy for more fans.
 

bigcc

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That's true. It's one of the ironies of sports that, in some ways, it's harder to come super close and fall short than to fall further away from the goal. This morning it's easier to be a Seahawk fan than a 49ers fan even though their season blew ours out of the water. Those of us who are Husky fans experienced the inverse quite recently.

My sense is it wasn't always this way to the same extent. My sense is that when I was much younger, coming in second still felt pretty good. That this began to shift in the 1970s but has become more pronounced over time. I don't remember college football fans worrying too much about a theoretical national title back in the day. It was about winning your conference, defeating your cross state rival, and winning a bowl game. If I were in charge of life, the universe and everything, I'd turn back the clock on a college football championship and go back to the old ways, as it led to more joy for more fans.
Https://x.com/AdamSchefter/status/1756905181122285587?s=20

I definitely agree it's difficult being a 9ers fan right now..... But they still have a bright short term future.... About 1.5 mil more cap room than us despite their scrub free agents. And yet they also have more draft capital than us, rounds 1,2,3,3,4,4,5,6,6,6,7.

A large portion of why they can do this is qb on rookie contract.... But that aside, 9ers fans are quickly going to realize that they're in fantastic position to run it back.

I don't kknow if I agree with the sentiment about coming in second in pro sports at any juncture, but I definitely agree about college.

We're at the point where bowl games quite literally mean nothing with the expanded playoffs.

I'm excited for the playoffs don't get me wrong, but the reality is, bowl games will likely be removed soon... Nobody is going to watch them
 

SoulfishHawk

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They played a hell of a game. But their luck ran out. It's fitting. GB and Detroit flat out gave those games away.
 

Parallax

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Https://x.com/AdamSchefter/status/1756905181122285587?s=20

I definitely agree it's difficult being a 9ers fan right now..... But they still have a bright short term future.... About 1.5 mil more cap room than us despite their scrub free agents. And yet they also have more draft capital than us, rounds 1,2,3,3,4,4,5,6,6,6,7.

A large portion of why they can do this is qb on rookie contract.... But that aside, 9ers fans are quickly going to realize that they're in fantastic position to run it back.

I don't kknow if I agree with the sentiment about coming in second in pro sports at any juncture, but I definitely agree about college.

We're at the point where bowl games quite literally mean nothing with the expanded playoffs.

I'm excited for the playoffs don't get me wrong, but the reality is, bowl games will likely be removed soon... Nobody is going to watch them
Those are good points. Are you a Husky fan? Do you feel good about the 2023 season. I do. I think of it as an amazing ride that I wouldn't trade for the world. But I notice that many fans seem bitter.
 

bigcc

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Those are good points. Are you a Husky fan? Do you feel good about the 2023 season. I do. I think of it as an amazing ride that I wouldn't trade for the world. But I notice that many fans seem bitter.
Born and raised fan/alumni.

I feel great about it, it was an amazing/harrowing ride (so many games where I was practically biting my nails at the end that they squeeked out).

It's just upsetting the end result was a coach who divided his focus to contract negotiations in the midst of a playoff run, and creating an exodus of talent, while grabbing next to nothing in recruiting.

I have no doubt he still leaves if uw wins the game, I don't think he particularly cared, and I think the players knew all this hence the sluggish start and 170 allowed rushing yards in the 1st quarter.

I love the 2023 team/season, but I wish nothing but the worst for DeBoer.
 

SoulfishHawk

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Those are good points. Are you a Husky fan? Do you feel good about the 2023 season. I do. I think of it as an amazing ride that I wouldn't trade for the world. But I notice that many fans seem bitter.
IF someone can't appreciate that incredible season by UW, they never will. They ran into a buzz saw in the final. Doesn't take away my appreciation one bit.
Go Dawgs. Keep hatin' Whoregon and Poog fans.
 

Parallax

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Born and raised fan/alumni.

I feel great about it, it was an amazing/harrowing ride (so many games where I was practically biting my nails at the end that they squeeked out).

It's just upsetting the end result was a coach who divided his focus to contract negotiations in the midst of a playoff run, and creating an exodus of talent, while grabbing next to nothing in recruiting.

I have no doubt he still leaves if uw wins the game, I don't think he particularly cared, and I think the players knew all this hence the sluggish start and 170 allowed rushing yards in the 1st quarter.

I love the 2023 team/season, but I wish nothing but the worst for DeBoer.
I share many of your perspectives. We've both said several times before that it wasn't DeBoer's leaving that offended but the manner in which he did so. I'd add that he went out of his way to give the impression he was staying. He spoke often of how much he loved the region, that his daughter was enrolled at the UW and playing sports here, that he wanted to put down roots. I understand that there are no good answers sometimes but DeBoer wasn't trying to be non-committal (as was Fisch) but rather making seemingly-definitive statements. He also said he wasn't signing the contract because he didn't want a distraction and gave a clear impression that it was just a matter of getting this championship run out of the way. Instead, he was distracted by his behind-the-scenes discussions.

I don't know if the players had an inkling. I hope they did not. It's hard to say why they came out flat in the championship game. I can set that aside. The football gods giveth and the football gods taketh away. But DeBoer unmasked himself as not-the-man-he-seemed-to-be.

I don't mean to be hyperbolic by using the word "sociopath". I'm not a psychologist and do not intend to diagnose. It's just that I know from my work that there is this group of people who are super smart, who know how to present and look one way while hiding a deeper reality. People who think circles around others and manipulate easily. And have no conscience about it. Until the mask slips, and then one gets a glimpse at who they really are. And I see evidence that's consistent with this sort of evaluation. It may or may not fit, but I think there's a chance it does.
 

Parallax

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IF someone can't appreciate that incredible season by UW, they never will. They ran into a buzz saw in the final. Doesn't take away my appreciation one bit.
Go Dawgs. Keep hatin' Whoregon and Poog fans.
Sums it up well for me too. Great season. I feel bad for my son, who is 9. He tends to think in black and white terms but I hope he comes to see the nuance as he matures.
 

bigcc

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I share many of your perspectives. We've both said several times before that it wasn't DeBoer's leaving that offended but the manner in which he did so. I'd add that he went out of his way to give the impression he was staying. He spoke often of how much he loved the region, that his daughter was enrolled at the UW and playing sports here, that he wanted to put down roots. I understand that there are no good answers sometimes but DeBoer wasn't trying to be non-committal (as was Fisch) but rather making seemingly-definitive statements. He also said he wasn't signing the contract because he didn't want a distraction and gave a clear impression that it was just a matter of getting this championship run out of the way. Instead, he was distracted by his behind-the-scenes discussions.

I don't know if the players had an inkling. I hope they did not. It's hard to say why they came out flat in the championship game. I can set that aside. The football gods giveth and the football gods taketh away. But DeBoer unmasked himself as not-the-man-he-seemed-to-be.

I don't mean to be hyperbolic by using the word "sociopath". I'm not a psychologist and do not intend to diagnose. It's just that I know from my work that there is this group of people who are super smart, who know how to present and look one way while hiding a deeper reality. People who think circles around others and manipulate easily. And have no conscience about it. Until the mask slips, and then one gets a glimpse at who they really are. And I see evidence that's consistent with this sort of evaluation. It may or may not fit, but I think there's a chance it does.
Agree 100 percent. He was literally asked about the contract the week of the championship btw so he probably knew by then, and he said something to the effect of "no chance until my daughter graduates".

Similarly, I'm uneasy calling him a sociopath, but the way he handled the situation displayed sociopathic tendencies.

It's also entirely possible he just messed up and too much happened too fast and was overwhelmed and made stupid decisions (assuming he cared in the slightest about uw).

We'll probably never know, but I feel it's fair to still judge him on the end result regardless of intentions, and he ****ed us
 

getnasty

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Anyone cheering for the Niner has never been to a game at Candlesitck. Never feared for my life like that before. Horrible fanbase, that I hope never wins anything.
 
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bigcc

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Sums it up well for me too. Great season. I feel bad for my son, who is 9. He tends to think in black and white terms but I hope he comes to see the nuance as he matures.
A humans brain isn't fully matured until they're 25.... So he'll probably be good lol

On top of which, at 9 you don't have the same kind of backdrop on what a season meant as we do. Children live in the moment so he just understands the lost championship.

He'll look more fondly on it as he gets older and experiences more sub par (to championship expectation) seasons, and sees the struggle it takes to get there more apparently
 

bileever

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That's true. It's one of the ironies of sports that, in some ways, it's harder to come super close and fall short than to fall further away from the goal. This morning it's easier to be a Seahawk fan than a 49ers fan even though their season blew ours out of the water. Those of us who are Husky fans experienced the inverse quite recently.

My sense is it wasn't always this way to the same extent. My sense is that when I was much younger, coming in second still felt pretty good. That this began to shift in the 1970s but has become more pronounced over time. I don't remember college football fans worrying too much about a theoretical national title back in the day. It was about winning your conference, defeating your cross state rival, and winning a bowl game. If I were in charge of life, the universe and everything, I'd turn back the clock on a college football championship and go back to the old ways, as it led to more joy for more fans.
I totally agree with you that sports fandom (and maybe society) has changed a lot in the last 50 years. Fans demand more now and they want the success to come fast. Expectations were lower in the 70s, people were more content to root for their team, win or lose. There was very little of this attitude that if you didn't win the championship that the total season was a disaster.

We've all become experts, and think we know better than the players and coaches. We've learned to spew vitriol when our team is losing, to blast the players, coaches and owners. We've come to the point where many fans view a winning season as a failure. Some fans are truly devastated when their team loses a game. I remember reading about soccer fans in England being fanatical like this in the 80s and laughing about it. Now, that same attitude is everywhere.

As a long-time coach, I always believed that sports were a communitarian thing that connected us together, not divided us. But it has become all about partisanship. Many people on this forum said that they have no interest in the Super Bowl if the Seahawks aren't in it. When I was a kid, everyone watched the World Series in October, regardless of who was in it. That's certainly not the case anymore.

There's no turning back the clock on any of this. A lot of this is the result of our society becoming a winner-take-all system, that it's okay to have a handful of billionaires as opposed to a middle class. But now I'm getting into politics, so I'll stop here.
 

bigcc

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I totally agree with you that sports fandom (and maybe society) has changed a lot in the last 50 years. Fans demand more now and they want the success to come fast. Expectations were lower in the 70s, people were more content to root for their team, win or lose. There was very little of this attitude that if you didn't win the championship that the total season was a disaster.

We've all become experts, and think we know better than the players and coaches. We've learned to spew vitriol when our team is losing, to blast the players, coaches and owners. We've come to the point where many fans view a winning season as a failure. Some fans are truly devastated when their team loses a game. I remember reading about soccer fans in England being fanatical like this in the 80s and laughing about it. Now, that same attitude is everywhere.

As a long-time coach, I always believed that sports were a communitarian thing that connected us together, not divided us. But it has become all about partisanship. Many people on this forum said that they have no interest in the Super Bowl if the Seahawks aren't in it. When I was a kid, everyone watched the World Series in October, regardless of who was in it. That's certainly not the case anymore.

There's no turning back the clock on any of this. A lot of this is the result of our society becoming a winner-take-all system, that it's okay to have a handful of billionaires as opposed to a middle class. But now I'm getting into politics, so I'll stop here.
I don't want to veer into politics either so I'll keep it short, but I think a lot of what you're talking about is attributable to the internet and being able to find sites like this, and even moreso social media where ANYONE has a voice, and not just people looking for a community to talk sports.

Easier to be fueled with vitriol when you can easily stumble across an easy means to talk to a community of opposing fans nearly instantaneously, for example.
 

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I've been a Hawks fan longer than most here ; and I find it hilarious to read the venom spewed at SF . The W/L record overall is 33-22 in favor of the Hawks . So why the hate ? What exactly did SF do to the Hawks besides lose to the Hawks 33 times ?
I want SF to win the SB for the simple reason of loyalty to the NFC West . If the Hawks couldn't make it to the big show ; then I want any other team in the division to get there and win ; and I don't care who . I want the NFC to be the best , most feared division in the NFL again . Having a SB champ in the division would be a damn good start , and should light a fire under the Hawks organization to do hit the field on a dead run this coming season .

The same reason any rivalry truly exists, it's how the fans treat each other...
 

Parallax

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Anyone cheering for the Niner has never been to a game at Candlesitck. Never feared for my life that that before. Horrible fanbase, that I hope never wins anything.
You're painting with a broad brush there, brother. Every fan base has immature fans and also some classy and knowledgeable ones. Hopefully we strive to be in the latter camp.
 

Parallax

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I totally agree with you that sports fandom (and maybe society) has changed a lot in the last 50 years. Fans demand more now and they want the success to come fast. Expectations were lower in the 70s, people were more content to root for their team, win or lose. There was very little of this attitude that if you didn't win the championship that the total season was a disaster.

We've all become experts, and think we know better than the players and coaches. We've learned to spew vitriol when our team is losing, to blast the players, coaches and owners. We've come to the point where many fans view a winning season as a failure. Some fans are truly devastated when their team loses a game. I remember reading about soccer fans in England being fanatical like this in the 80s and laughing about it. Now, that same attitude is everywhere.

As a long-time coach, I always believed that sports were a communitarian thing that connected us together, not divided us. But it has become all about partisanship. Many people on this forum said that they have no interest in the Super Bowl if the Seahawks aren't in it. When I was a kid, everyone watched the World Series in October, regardless of who was in it. That's certainly not the case anymore.

There's no turning back the clock on any of this. A lot of this is the result of our society becoming a winner-take-all system, that it's okay to have a handful of billionaires as opposed to a middle class. But now I'm getting into politics, so I'll stop here.
It's hard not to at times skirt the edges of politics. I won't get into it either other than to share my perspective that any society that allows for there to be, in real life (not sports), those who have more than they could ever need and those who don't have access to really basic things like food, clean water, shelter and basic healthcare, is mentally ill. So it's not fair to suggest, as I did in another post, that DeBoer may be sociopathic without mentioning that our entire society may be sociopathic and, thus, each one of us to one extent or another (as I pontificate from my comfortable chair, in my warm, comfortable home).
 
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